Top 10 Punk Front Men

30
Jun

Top 10 Punk Front Men

Eric Leach of Symbol Six

Eric Leach of Symbol Six

 

Number 10
Eric Leach

At a time when punk bands seem to rely solely on their back catalog, Leach and Symbol Six have bypassed the whole nostalgia circuit and perform almost a new and much harder set of songs. While most of their contemporaries have a wall of security around the stage or some kind of stainless-steel barricade, Leach is in the pit banging with the best of them.

Darby Crash of The Germs

Darby Crash of The Germs

Number 9
Darby Crash

Darby had charisma but was always loaded. If he were sober, I would’ve bumped him up a notch or two.

Lee Ving of Fear

Lee Ving of Fear

Number 8
Lee Ving

Lee fits into that category of love or hate. The stage presence was definitely there. The whole insulting the crowd was a fairly new thing and Fear did it well.

Mike Ness of Social Distortion

Mike Ness of Social Distortion

Number 7
Mike Ness

Whether wrapped in toilet paper, or Alice Cooper make-up under his eyes, Mike has always given great performances.

Mike Muir of Suicidal Tendencies

Mike Muir of Suicidal Tendencies

Number 6
Mike Muir

I haven’t seen Suicidal since the early ‘80’s, so this is based on S.T.’s early days, and based on that Mike controlled his audience. Once they were announced a hundred or two “gang-members” would charge the pit. It was something.

HR of Bad Brains

HR of Bad Brains

Number 5
HR

Love him or hate him, HR is a madman on stage. The flips and acrobatics, crazy stuff.

Glenn Danzig of The Misfits

Glenn Danzig of The Misfits

Number 4
Glenn Danzig

If the voice (Jim Morrison meets Elvis) didn’t get you, the East Coast attitude with the “death-lock” hairdo was something to behold. The bodybuilding added to the Misfits overall appeal.

Tony Cadena of The Adolescents

Tony Cadena of The Adolescents

Number 3
Tony Cadena

Back in the early ‘80’s Tony never stayed still, whether he was flying into the audience, or rolling around on stage, he was a performer.

Henry Rollins of Black Flag

Henry Rollins of Black Flag

Number 2
Henry Rollins

Love him or hate him, over twenty-five years on and people can’t stop discussing him. He had great stage presence, and he is one of the most recognized “punks” in the world.

Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols

Johnny Rotten of The Sex Pistols

Number 1
Johnny Rotten

Nobody epitomized the angry punk the way Rotten did. The disdain in his voice. He was the mold of a punk singer.

Honorable Mentions: Dave Vanian, Wattie, John Macias, etc.

Thanks to Jay Thurston for this idea. These are my choices; I’m sticking to them.

 

 

misconceptions_of_hell_001

Misconceptions of Hell is available now: http://goo.gl/n9ofGb

Who Is Billy Bones?

25
Jun

Who Is Billy Bones?

Who Is Billy Bones?

Who Is Billy Bones?
Billy Bones, Christina Fortuna, Dani Fortuna, Eileen Fortuna, Christa Collins and more
June 22, 2016 – Cola Kat
Directed by: Kathy Kolla

Who Is Billy Bones? highlights the four-decade-long music career of legendary punk rock vocalist Steven “Billy Bones” Fortuna. Billy Bones was an early pioneer of the punk genre, fronting the 1977 Los Angeles punk band The Skulls with his snarling vocals and socially charged lyrics. Directed by Kathy Kolla, an award-winning director, screenwriter, and actress, the documentary features interviews with punk rock legends including Green Day bassist Mike Dirnt, Woolly Bandits member Christa Collins, Dr. Strange Records founder Dr. Strange and Fortuna’s wife Christina. The film includes never-before-seen footage of L.A.’s first punk music venue, The Masque, shot exclusively for the project, along with archive interview footage of The Masque’s original proprietor, Brendan Mullen.

Billy Bones

Billy Bones

As front man of the seminal L.A. punk band The Skulls, Steven “Billy Bones” Fortuna has made a lasting impact on the genre. After moving to Los Angeles in the early 1970s, Billy Bones quickly made his way into the underground punk rock scene, performing at the legendary Hollywood punk club The Masque and recording the now-classic song “Victims.” In the early 1980s, Bones dabbled in the burgeoning new wave genre, recording unreleased material for Geffen records before retiring from music for nearly two decades. A reformation of his band The Skulls provided a much-needed dose of energy in the early 2000’s punk scene, and the band recorded two full-length albums, as well as performed dates on the Warp Tour and toured Europe twice.

Billy Bones

Billy Bones

Unlike many other music documentaries, Who Is Billy Bones is just as interesting if not more interesting when focusing on his personal life. Meeting his wife, starting a family and the honesty in discussing his daughter’s health issues. By the time the film was over you are left with a true admiration for Billy and his family. There is never a scene where Billy shows any pretentiousness at all, you get the impression that despite being an L.A. punk legend, you’d still be welcome at his table for dinner.

If you haven’t seen this, track it down on either PBS or any of the local screenings of it.

Rating: *** three out of three stars

 

 

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Misconceptions of Hell is available now: http://goo.gl/n9ofGb

Rancid – Rancid

21
Jun

Rancid

Rancid

Rancid
Rancid
May 10, 1993
Epitaph Records

Tim Armstrong – vocals, guitar,
Matt Freeman – bass, vocals
Brett Reed – drums

1. Adina
2. Hyena
3. Detroit
4. Rats in the Hallway
5. Another Night
6. Animosity
7. Outta My Mind
8. Whirlwind
9. Rejected
10. Injury
11. The Bottle
12. Trenches
13. Holiday Sunrise
14. Unwritten Rules
15. Union Blood (Hidden Track)
16. Get Out Of My Way

Childhood friends Tim Armstrong and Matt Freeman grew up together in the small, working-class town of Albany, California, near Berkeley. The two played together in the band Operation Ivy from 1987–1989. The band became popular in the at 924 Gilman Street scene, a club that features Bay Area punk bands. When Operation Ivy broke-up, Armstrong and Freeman decided to form a band called Downfall, which disbanded after a few months. They then started a hardcore band called Generator, which also disbanded shortly after. They also started the ska influenced Dance Hall Crashers, though left the band shortly after it was formed. During this time, Armstrong was struggling with alcoholism, and to keep him focused on other interests, Freeman suggested they form a new band. In 1991, they recruited Armstrong’s roommate Brett Reed as their drummer and formed Rancid.

A few months after the band’s inception, Rancid began performing around the Berkeley area and quickly developed a fan following. Rancid’s first release was a 1992 EP for Operation Ivy’s old label Lookout! Records. Shortly its release the band left Lookout! and signed to Bad Religion guitarist Brett Gurewitz’s record label, Epitaph Records. Rancid released its self-titled debut album through Epitaph in 1993.

Rancid’s eponymously titled debut studio album Rancid was released on May 10, 1993, through Epitaph Records. Rancid is the only Rancid album not to feature Lars Frederiksen on guitar, although he joined while the band was touring in support of it. It was the second of three self-titled releases, the others being the group’s debut EP (1992) and its fifth studio album (2000).

Mike DaRonco of Allmusic stated “This is where it all starts. Without any reminiscing about their former band, Operation Ivy, Matt Freeman (bass) and Tim Armstrong (guitar/vocals) blast through their debut without any hints of ska or blatant Clash plagiarizing. On the contrary, this album rips through 15 tracks of high-energy punk that’s accompanied by heavy bass leads and Armstrong’s permanently slurred vocals. And to top it all off, the lyrical content deals with urban blight and the lifestyle of being a public nuisance. With this trademark sound, Rancid provide the perfect soundtrack for any car chase that includes massive property damage; is it a wonder MTV wouldn’t touch this?”

Rating: ** * two out of three stars

On to the story . . .

Years ago I was watching an episode of Taxi Cab Confessions (remember that show?). And one of the guys that hopped into the back of the cab was a subway cop. Like they did, they baited the guy long enough until they got him talking.

One of his worst experiences while working the subway was this:

A guy was standing too close to the edge and was somehow pushed over and onto the subway tracks. While he was on the tracks the subway came and hit him. The lower half of his body was stuck under the tracks. When the train hit him it twisted the top of his body completely around. Now the subway cop had the horrible job of going down onto the tracks and telling the guy that he is alive at the moment, but once they attempt to remove him that his body will spin back around and sever his spine and he will die instantly.

I can’t think of a more horrible task. The guy is alive, though traumatized, and looking at you, understanding your words, but trying to comprehend the fact that if moved he is dead.

I’ve never had to deal with death like that. Most of the people that I’ve known have gone very quickly.

In 1984, while in barber school, I was leaving through the back door one day at lunch, when, about, twenty feet away from me, I heard a small cherry-picker whirring away and lifting a guy up into the air. The guy got out of the picker and was attempting to wrap a belt around his waist and the telephone pole.

I watched him leave the cherry-picker, loop the belt and then I saw him fall and hit his head on the curb. For a second every one of the four other pole workers yelled, “Oh my god, shit,” etc. Then everything went insanely quiet. For the next five minutes, it was like the city shut down.

I watched, after what felt like hours, as one of the crew members ran to the truck and radioed for help.

I stood there for a little bit, kind of, stunned. And not really able to move, then all at once the world started again. Cars flying by, the crew started chatting to bystanders. In an instant, everything was back to normal, with the exception of a guy lying in the gutter with his head on the curb.

It was all very surreal. I had to return to school. At 2:30, when I was leaving, the crew was gone as was the body. That night I popped on the news and there was no mention of the guy. Kind of sad.

 

 

Born Frustrated is available now: http://goo.gl/n9ofGb

Whatever68 Radio 4-Year Festival

17
Jun

Whatever 68 Radio

Whatever 68 Radio

Whatever68 Radio 4-Year Festival
MandoShanks, Los Homeless, Carpit, Rodents, Destruction Made Simple, NSA, A Bleeding Sky, Damaged, Sculpins, Midnight Track and Agent 86
The Bancroft, Spring Valley, CA
Saturday, April 2, 2016
Time: 3:00 PM

Agent 86

Agent 86

The Whatever68 Festival was a great success. The bands, MandoShanks, Los Homeless, Carpit, Rodents, Destruction Made Simple, NSA, A Bleeding Sky, Damaged, Sculpins, Midnight Track, and Agent 86, who rocked along with the stage manager Max who helped to keep the bands on time. The Bancroft crew was great doing all they could to help us out and Rob the owner is a great guy who supports the scene all around check out his band The Mice. Melanie, Leland, and David were great helping prepare, set up and clean up as everyone else also pitched in one way or another.

Bob Oedy of The Grim & Michael Essington

Bob Oedy of The Grim & Michael Essington

We have some awesome photos taken by Antoinette Arceo you can find on the Whatever68 Festival page give it a “like” https://www.facebook.com/we68fest We had some amazing Special Guests Damien’s art went really well and you can expect him at the 2017 Festival and other shows throughout the year! Russ, Bob Oedy, and Mike Essington all came with their books, Timm Saxton put on an amazing acoustic set that everyone loved we will definitely continue having acoustic sets at the festivals, SD Gorilla cooked us up some yummy food and all the guests were amazing some driving down from the LA/LB/OC and surrounding areas thanks to everyone that was a part of Whatever68 2016 Festival!

Whatever68 Radio Festival

Whatever68 Radio Festival

 

 

Born Frustrated is available now: http://goo.gl/n9ofGb

Channel 3 – I’ve Got a Gun/Lights Out

15
Jun

Channel 3

Channel 3

Channel 3
I’ve Got a Gun/Lights Out
1991
Anagram Records

Mike Magrann – guitar, vocals
Kimm Gardener – guitar
Larry Kelley – bass
Mike Burton – drums

1. Fear Of Life
2. Out Of Control
3. I’ve Got A Gun
4. Wetspots
5. Accident
6. You Make Me Feel Cheap
7. You Lie
8. Catholic Boy
9. Waiting In The Wings
10. Strength In Numbers
11. Double Standard Boys
12. Life Goes On
13. What About Me?
14. Stupid Girl
15. Separate Peace
16. No Love
17. After The Lights Go Out
18. Truth & Trust
19. I’ll Take My Chance
20. All My Dreams
21. Can’t Afford It
22. I Didn’t Know
23. Manzanar (Bonus Track)
24. Mannequin (Bonus Track)
25. Indian Summer (Bonus Track)

In 1994, I’ve Got a Gun/Lights Out was released on one compact disc, which contained two complete albums — I’ve Got a Gun (1982), originally released on No Future, and Lights Out — by Channel 3. This collection has also been released under the title The Skinhead Years.

Channel 3 centers around the friendship of Mike Magrann (vocals, guitar) and Kimm Gardner (guitar), which dates back to the second grade. Forming in 1980, the foursome included Larry Kelley (bass) and Mike Burton (drums, later replaced by Jack DeBaun). They released an EP, Channel 3, on Posh Boy Records in the summer of 1981 and began playing shows in the Los Angeles area. In the summer of 1982, their first album Fear of Life was released, and the band began their first US tour.

After 1983 the band experimented with other styles, alienating some fans. Eventually, it returned to its roots, touring Europe in the 1990s and releasing a more punk-oriented CD in 2002.

If you don’t own it, go and pick it up.

Rating: ** * two out of three stars

On to the story . . .

Back in 1995, I was dating a girl, which I thought was the last girl I would ever date. And one day we started talking about buying a car together and eventually getting an apartment together.

It just so happened that my dad was selling a small black SUV. I asked him if we could buy it from him, and he was his usual direct self and said, “No, I don’t sell to people I know. It creates too many problems.” In all actuality, I don’t think that was the case. I think he saw cracks in the relationship before I did. Well, we weren’t deterred, we continued our car search. We went from one end of Van Nuys Blvd to the other. My credit was fair and hers was non-existent. So, the financing wasn’t happening, which later turned out to be a good thing.

Well, one day we were at a small dealership a block down from the Van Nuys police department. My, then, girlfriend was going to test drive this big SUV, the owner of the lot asks her for her license. She says she left it in the car, I give him mine.

She takes the SUV out, I sit in the passenger seat. We get five blocks out and the thing dies, just completely dead in the street.

We get out, walk back to the dealership, I get my license. The owner gets an attitude and says, “Where the fuck is my car?” I give him the address of where we left the SUV and we left. We get to the car we came in and we realize that my former girlfriend had thrown the keys under the seat of the now broke down/busted SUV. Fucking great.

So we head back to the office and I tell the guy that I need a ride back to the SUV, and he gets a crazy attitude, “This isn’t a fuckin’ taxi service!”

So as nicely as I can put it, I say, “Listen you old fuck, it’s your fault we’re in this mess. If you weren’t trying to sell piece of shit cars, the keys wouldn’t be six blocks away.”

He waves two big Hispanic guys over, and says in broken Spanish, “Go get the car.”

I follow them to a big white pick-up truck. I start to get inside, but one of the guys says, “There’s no room, get in the back.”

Needless to say, I was suspicious. I hop in the back and hold on, and just as I thought, the driver guns it. He peels out of the driveway at about 75 or 80 miles an hour. They took every corner at around 65 miles per hour. I was trying to act nonchalant while calling them goat-fuckers and anything else that popped into my head while holding on for dear life.

As soon as we pulled up to the stalled SUV I jumped out and charged the driver, but the passenger was already in front of me with a length of chain, approximately six feet long, in his left hand, and with his right, he was swinging the excess. I imagine two things here, one – they’ve done this before and two – the chain may or may not have been intended to be used to tow the SUV back. Either way, I stepped back from beating the crap out of the driver. But there is no way in hell it was over.

I opened the SUV and grabbed my senile girlfriend’s keys and proceeded to walk back to the lot. I wasn’t about to hop in the back of the truck again.

As I approached the lot I saw a construction site, I walked over and picked up two cinder blocks. Then met up with the girlfriend on the corner, next to the dealership.

My girlfriend gave me the look over and said, “What are you doing with those blocks?” At this point I was in no mood to talk, I just said, as I handed her the keys, “Let’s go.”

As we walked past the auto dealership I saw the owner hug and start whispering stuff into Damian Chapa’s ear. Remember Damian Chapa? The white guy from Blood In, Blood Out, the movie that was on Showtime every fifteen minutes during the 1990’s.

My first thought was, “What the fuck is the head of the Mexican Mafia doing here?”

We get in the car and as we round the corner, I lean out the window and fire off the first cinder block I nail the stalled SUV, the block bounces off the hood and it shatters the window. Then we drive six to ten feet, I fire the second cinder block into the group of people standing in front of the dealership, the owner, Chapa and the two assholes from the truck. Chapa and the two douche-bags, duck, the block flies past them and nails the owner right in the knee. He falls and everybody starts chasing the car. My girlfriend is screaming. “What the hell did you do?” I say, “Nothing, drive.” She peels out.

Needless to say, we never bought a car together and we split, I think, five to six months after that.

I still wonder what the hell was Chapa doing there?!

 

 

Born Frustrated is available now: http://goo.gl/n9ofGb

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